Monday, September 12, 2016

What I Learned About Race Walking Will Surprise You.


I'm going WAY back to marathon weekend for this post.  Do you remember when I said that after the race the roof of my mouth hurt and that I couldn't swallow?

Well that feeling continued into that evening too and it made it difficult for me to thinking about eating a big meal.  After looking over a few menus we decided on going to Wolf Gang Puck because they had Butternut Squash Soup and Mashed Potatoes!

As you can imagine there was quite a crowd there that evening. As we were waiting in line we met two sisters ( I think they were from Ohio) who also did the marathon. The one sister had the same mouth problem as I did. We thought that was weird.  Anyway, because space was limited in Wolfgang Puck they invited my sister and I to sit with them.

Okay, so this is where the story becomes interesting. We learned that these sister are Race Walkers!  They finished the Disney World Marathon in 5:35! That's not bad for a runner let alone a WALKER. And guess what? That's not even their PR. I believe they said their PR for Race Walking was 5:05.  Now that's crazy isn't it?

I became intrigued with this whole race walking thing.  I am normally a fast walker anyway so I thought this could be something I could work on during the Spring/Summer.  I tried to do some research on the topic to get some tips but I couldn't find much at all.

I started walking at the park and just moving my arms and picking up the pace.  I could get my pace to a 14-ish mile per minute with ALL walking.  I guess I would be okay to do a Disney race since the minimum mile per minute is 16.  But could I hold that pace for an entire marathon?  NO WAY!!!  Race walking is hard and and it put a lot of strain on my ankles.  Obviously I was doing something wrong.

                                                         Then I came across this video .

Yes, this is a Holderness family video (You know how I love the Holderness family) so it is a bit funny but Penn is actually getting tips from a legit coach.  Can you believe the record for race walking is 5:38 per mile?

So if you watched the video you would find that the key is the "swagger".  I haven't tried the race walking since I watched this video but I did incorporate a little bit of  this "swagger" during my last run for a little bit and to be honest it actually made my running feel better. Maybe there is something to that!  -M

So what are your thoughts on the Race Walking?  Do you have a little swagger in your run?

We are linking up with the gals from TOTR.


54 comments:

  1. Oh those race walkers are fast. I remember in a couple of my slower marathons having a few pass me early on and I was like no way is a racewalker passing me, LOL But yeah they can kick butt, that wiggle walk isn't easy. The taller you are the easier it is so I have been told. I'm 5,4 so not exactly tall maybe that's why I have never learned to do it.
    However my 11 year old niece is as tall as me now, probably going to be 6 feet and the girl can race walk so fast, she's got the wiggle down and everything and she doesn't think it hurts her at all, LOL Oh to have youth on your side with new things LOL

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    1. O goodness, if it's a matter of height than I have no hope of being a race walker (or a very fast one..lol)

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  2. I recently read an article about how hard it is to race walk a marathon. It's amazing how fast race walkers can be!

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    1. Yea, I don't think I could race walk a marathon. Sure I could walk it but I couldn't keep up a "race" pace!

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  3. 5:38?? Okay I am going to have to google race walking later today because I don't understand how someone can walk that fast! I think the fastest I have walked is in the 14s...

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  4. Race walking is my secret plan for when and if running becomes too much for me. My hope is that I can run into my 80's, but I LOVE walking fast and I think this would be a great, lower impact option (although I'm with you - it's a whole different set of muscles!). And I love how you too meet strangers and have lunch with them. So fun!!

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    1. Haha, It was great to meet them and learn about their race walking! It is definitely harder than it sounds.

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  5. There used to be this blogger, MILF runner, who had a total hip replacement and couldn't run anymore. So she walked a marathon, and in less than 6 hours! I was so impressed. Especially because I know people who run in that time.

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  6. I have watched some race walkers and it always kind of makes me want to laugh, and I wonder why not just run! Some get really fast though!

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    1. There is a guy in town who looks like he is walking instead of running but boy o boy he smoked me at a local race recently.

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  7. Way back when I did some racewalking. It's how I got started running really. In fact, there was a whole racewalking push in the 90s, special divisions in races, series, etc. I was even seeded in a local series for racewalking. There were judges on the course and everything. It's quite intense. But I would always train for these races by running. Honestly I thought people would think I was a freak if I was walking around my neighborhood with that "swagger"! lol! So I transitioned to full time running and the racewalking has really lost it's thing around where I live. No more walking divisions, etc.

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    1. I bet that would have been cool to be involved in.

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  8. I really don't know how anyone can walk that fast!! If I'm walking really quickly I always feel like breaking into a run. I'd have to overcome that feeling to get into racewalking.

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    1. Yes, I've felt like I just wanted to run when I was "race walking"!

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  9. I didn't even know about race walking until London 2012. I don't know much, just that one foot has to be on the ground so you can't run. I walk fast, but not that fast.

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    1. Yes, One foot has to be on the ground. I think that would be hard to not want to run!

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  10. I didn't realize race walking was as much of a thing! I keep telling my Dad we should sign up to walk a 5K, just so he could get a medal. He walks pretty slow though.
    Super curious if you decide to do it!

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    1. I think I may have to wait until a time I am not training for a running race.

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  11. I've seen the race walkers at big racers and they can be really fast! It's amazing really and probably a lot better on the joints

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    1. I thought it would be better on the knees but it ended up that it was hurting my ankles. But then again I was doing it all wrong!

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  12. I really don't know much about race walking. I heard they do it at the Olympics and are probably faster than me running! Very cool!

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    1. I I didnt even know it was a thing either until I met these gals!

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  13. I have a friend who actually trained to do that after he injured himself doing the Ironman... he did really well with it.
    I'd probably get faster times & less knee pain with it.

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  14. Race walking looks INTENSE! I am not sure I could do it.

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  15. This is a super intriguing topic! I ran the Chicago Marathon in 5:27 so I'm blown away by someone walking it in 5:05. Fast walking is definitely no joke. It uses different muscles than running, yes? So it would require it's own specific training! I definitely wouldn't be able to hold a fast-walking pace for very long!!!

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    1. YES, Yes, Yes, I can definitely tell it uses different muscles than running!

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  16. I do not do anything fast. Seriously.

    I've definitely been passed by race walkers in a half. And I had a friend who did it for a while, but then the group she was doing it with fell apart so she stopped.

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    1. I know I'd get passed by race walkers as well!

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  17. I used to watch the race walk marathon at the Olympics when I was little, and when I trained, I used to see this man on the track race walk training, he flew by ! it was amazing!

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  18. My friend in California started race walking this year and he is hella fast! I videoed him for some reminder tips, because I keep thinking that if I could speed up my walks when I do intervals during my longer runs, I could get to the finish line a bit faster. It feels different, though, and you're right - it does stress different parts of the body compared to running. Still, I think it's a good thing and I'm impressed at your pace!

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    1. I heard that when you are running intervals like run/walk that you should not be race walking during those walks. I use to do that too but I guess that is wrong for the body. I think that came from Jeff Galloway.

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    2. Interesting - thanks for the info on that...I wonder if it's because you don't get any break that way?

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  19. I haven't tried race walking, but every now and then I'll see one on the running path and think that it looks super hard. That video was hilarious! Had never heard of this family before, but I just got sucked in and watched 3 or 4 of their videos. (oops!)

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    1. OMG this family is the best! You need to watch their "40" video!

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  20. Wow, that's impressive that people can walk that fast! It's faster than I run :)

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    1. I know that is super impressive! Something to strive for..haha

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  21. Race walkers blow my mind! Olympic caliber ones can walk faster than I run. I have a friend who was coming back from a stress fracture so she walked Boston in just a hair over 5 hours. Crazy.

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  22. My coach is a race walker and his pace is somewhere around 7:30 I think? It's ridiculous. He WALKS faster than I run!!! Like, all out sprint! Haha.

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    1. I wonder how someone gets to that point? Is he a runner as well or strictly a walker?

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  23. I have to say that i didn't know that this was an Olympic event ... and then I laughed ... and then I realized how intense it was. I mean a sub 6 minute mile??? That's nuts! And those girls put in some seriously good times! I've seen a few race walkers during races I've done and have been really impressed by the pace they have been able to keep!

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  24. Race walking blows my mind. They did a thing on it during the Olympics this year, and there are all these rules like you feet being in contact with the ground and such. One Olympics the person who would have won gold was DQ'ed 150 m from the finish!!!

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  25. During my first half marathon, I decided to try to follow and keep up with this elderly race walker, but he totally lost me by mile 4! They are FAST! I always feel like they're going to have hip issues because of that swinging movement, but I guess their speed is all in their hips!

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  26. race walking is incredible-i watched it during the Olympics and were amazed at their times!

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  27. I am impressed with race walking but I think it is a completely different skill and like anything, you need to learn it. I doubt I could just decide to do it and all would be OK. I was assuming there is something specific to it, so not surprising that swagger is part of it.

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  28. So interesting! I couldnt imagine waking a marathon. Whenever I walk somewhere I always think about how I would get there so much faster if I ran! But thats awesome that they were able to walk that race in such a respectable time!

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Fairytales and Fitness is a personal blog authored and edited by us, Meranda and Lacey. The thoughts expressed here represent only our own and are not meant to be taken as professional advice. Please note that our thoughts and opinions change from time to time. We consider this a necessary consequence of having an open mind in an ever changing society. Any thoughts and opinions expressed within our out-of-date posts may not be the same, nor even similar, to those we may express today.